MediTouch 2 connect Blood Glucose Monitor starter set (mmol/L)

MediTouch 2 connect Blood Glucose Monitor start set (mmol/L)
Wireless connect blood glucose data with your mobile device

 

Description

MediTouch 2 connect Blood Glucose Monitor start set

MDD
Medical Device Directive certified medical device
VitaDock + app
Bluetooth® Smart (4.0) data transfer to the VitaDock+ app for iOS and Android and to VitaDock Online
Measurement unit
mmol/L, no coding required
Precise measurement accuracy
Precise measurement accuracy according to the new ISO (DIS) 15197 thanks to new test strip technology
0.6 μL blood sample
1.1 – 35.0 mmol/L measuring range
Approx. 5 seconds measuring time
Acoustic test reminder
Large LCD display (32 x 42 mm)
480 memory slots
Pre and post meal markers
Starter set
Starter set including blood glucose monitor, test strips, lancets, lancing device, control solution, AST cap
MDD
Medical Device Directive certified medical device
VitaDock + app
Bluetooth® Smart (4.0) data transfer to the VitaDock+ app for iOS and Android and to VitaDock Online
Measurement unit
mmol/L, no coding required
Approx. 5 seconds measuring time
Precise measurement accuracy
Precise measurement accuracy according to the new ISO (DIS) 15197 thanks to new test strip technology
Acoustic test reminder
0.6 μL blood sample
1.1 – 35.0 mmol/L measuring range
Large LCD display (32 x 42 mm)
Pre and post meal markers
Starter set
Starter set including blood glucose monitor, test strips, lancets, lancing device, control solution, AST cap

What is Blood Glucose (Blood Sugar)?

When you eat carbohydrate, your stomach turns it into a sugar called glucose and sends that to your bloodstream. Glucose is precious fuel for all the cells in your body when it’s present at normal levels. Your pancreas releases insulin, a hormone that helps move glucose from your blood into your cells, which use it for energy.

What is Blood Glucose (Blood Sugar)?

When you eat carbohydrate, your stomach turns it into a sugar called glucose and sends that to your bloodstream.
Glucose is precious fuel for all the cells in your body when it’s present at normal levels.
Your pancreas releases insulin, a hormone that helps move glucose from your blood into your cells, which use it for energy.

What happens if the Pancreas doesn’t function normally?

When the pancreas produces very little or no insulin or when the body does not respond appropriately to insulin, diabetes can occur. When you have diabetes, your blood sugar (or blood glucose) levels may be consistently high. Over time, this can damage your body and lead to many other problems.

What happens if the Pancreas doesn’t function normally?

When the pancreas produces very little or no insulin or when the body does not respond appropriately to insulin, diabetes can occur.
When you have diabetes, your blood sugar (or blood glucose) levels may be consistently high. Over time, this can damage your body and lead to many other problems.

Types of Diabetes Mellitus

Types of Diabetes Mellitus

Normal and Diabetic Blood Glucose Range

Target Levels by TypeBefore mealsAt least 90 minutes after meals
Non-diabetic4.0-5.9 mmol/LUnder 7.8 mmol/L
Type 2 diabetes4-7 mmol/LUnder 8.5 mmol/L
Type 1 diabetes4-7 mmol/L5-9 mmol/L
Children w/ type 1 diabetes4-7 mmol/L9 mmol/L
Low sugar level< 3.3 mmol/LN/A
* Source: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
Normal blood glucose levels are less than 5.6 mmol/dL after not eating (fasting) for at least 8 hours. And they’re less than 7.8 mmol/dL 2 hours after eating. During the day, levels tend to be at their lowest just before meals.

Normal and Diabetic Blood Glucose Range

Target Levels by TypeBefore mealsAt least 90 minutes after meals
Non-diabetic4.0-5.9 mmol/LUnder 7.8 mmol/L
Type 2 diabetes4-7 mmol/LUnder 8.5 mmol/L
Type 1 diabetes4-7 mmol/L5-9 mmol/L
Children w/ type 1 diabetes4-7 mmol/L9 mmol/L
Low sugar level< 3.3 mmol/LN/A
* Source: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
Normal blood glucose levels are less than 5.6 mmol/dL after not eating (fasting) for at least 8 hours. And they’re less than 7.8 mmol/dL 2 hours after eating. During the day, levels tend to be at their lowest just before meals.

What happens if Blood Glucose Level is too low or too high?

p5_image9
Low
Causes: Not eaten enough food
Too much insulin within the body
p5_image10
High
Causes: Eats too much food
Too little insulin to regulate their blood sugar

What happens if Blood Glucose Level is too low or too high?

p5_image9
Low
Causes: Not eaten enough food
Too much insulin within the body
p5_image10
High
Causes: Eats too much food
Too little insulin to regulate their blood sugar

Too much sugar harms your body

Weight Gain
Lead to problems like diabetes and some cancers.

Type 2 Diabetes
When sugar stays in your blood, your body may react by making less of the hormone insulin.

Liver Disease
If your body intakes too much fructose, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease may form.

High Blood Pressure
Sugar raises blood pressure by making your insulin levels spike too high. That makes your blood vessels less flexible and cause your kidneys to hold onto water and sodium.

High Cholesterol
Sugary diets are bad for your heart. They can raise your “bad” (LDL) cholesterol and lower the “good” (HDL) cholesterol.

Gout
Purines, released when your body breaks fructose down, makes uric acid build up in your blood.

Cavities
Sugary diets feed the bacteria in your mouth, which leave behind acid that wears away your tooth enamel.

Kidney Stones
Too much fructose – from table sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, or processed foods – raises your chances for kidney stones.

Poor Sleep
Too much sugar during the day can mess with your blood glucose. You may struggle to stay awake at work or at school. In the evenings, a bowl of ice cream or cookies can pump you with sugar that can wake you up at night. It also can cut short the time you’re in deep sleep.

Aging
Sugary drinks may add years to your biological age.

Too much sugar harms your body

Weight Gain
Lead to problems like diabetes and some cancers.

Type 2 Diabetes
When sugar stays in your blood, your body may react by making less of the hormone insulin.

Liver Disease
If your body intakes too much fructose, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease may form.

High Blood Pressure
Sugar raises blood pressure by making your insulin levels spike too high. That makes your blood vessels less flexible and cause your kidneys to hold onto water and sodium.

High Cholesterol
Sugary diets are bad for your heart. They can raise your “bad” (LDL) cholesterol and lower the “good” (HDL) cholesterol.

Gout
Purines, released when your body breaks fructose down, makes uric acid build up in your blood.

Cavities
Sugary diets feed the bacteria in your mouth, which leave behind acid that wears away your tooth enamel.

Kidney Stones
Too much fructose – from table sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, or processed foods – raises your chances for kidney stones.

Poor Sleep
Too much sugar during the day can mess with your blood glucose. You may struggle to stay awake at work or at school. In the evenings, a bowl of ice cream or cookies can pump you with sugar that can wake you up at night. It also can cut short the time you’re in deep sleep.

Aging
Sugary drinks may add years to your biological age.

Blood Sugar Control When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

Blood Sugar Control When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

Check your blood sugar levels at least once a day with a blood glucose meter, and keep a record of the readings. Know Your Numbers Watch Your Weight Write down your meals and snacks each day to give yourself a better picture of what you eat. Find a way to move your body for at least 30 minutes a day. Fill Up on Fiber Since your body doesn’t digest it, it doesn’t raise your blood sugar. Keep Your Cool Diabetes feel hotter faster than other people. A hot body doesn't deal with blood sugar as well. Get Physical Regular exercise makes insulin work better in your body. Never leave home without your meds or snacks. And pack more than you think you’ll need of both. Be Travel-Wise Take Some Pressure Off Taking care of mental health boosts your physical health and also good management of sugar in the blood. Pay Attention to Portions Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables, and split the other half between a lean protein and a grain. Too much sugar during the day can mess with your blood glucose. You may struggle to stay awake at work or at school. In the evenings, a bowl of ice cream or cookies can pump you with sugar that can wake you up at night. It also can cut short the time you’re in deep sleep. Snooze So You Don't Lose Drink up Don’t wait until you feel thirsty to drink. Diabetes can dry you out. Carbohydrates turn right into glucose after you eat them. So it’s extra important to keep them in check. Choose healthy fats like monounsaturated, omega-3, and polyunsaturated ones. Your body needs fat for energy. Filter Your Fats Mind Your Meds Go Small With Alcohol If you do need insulin or other meds, take them as you should, even when
you feel good.
If you drink, women should stick to one 12-ounce beer, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of liquor a day at most. Men should have only twice that. And don’t drink on an empty stomach or when your blood sugar is low. Be Carb Smart

Check your blood sugar levels at least once a day with a blood glucose meter, and keep a record of the readings. Know Your Numbers Watch Your Weight Write down your meals and snacks each day to give yourself a better picture of what you eat. Find a way to move your body for at least 30 minutes a day. Fill Up on Fiber Since your body doesn’t digest it, it doesn’t raise your blood sugar. Keep Your Cool Diabetes feel hotter faster than other people. A hot body doesn't deal with blood sugar as well. Get Physical Regular exercise makes insulin work better in your body. Never leave home without your meds or snacks. And pack more than you think you’ll need of both. Be Travel-Wise Take Some Pressure Off Taking care of mental health boosts your physical health and also good management of sugar in the blood. Pay Attention to Portions Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables, and split the other half between a lean protein and a grain. Too much sugar during the day can mess with your blood glucose. You may struggle to stay awake at work or at school. In the evenings, a bowl of ice cream or cookies can pump you with sugar that can wake you up at night. It also can cut short the time you’re in deep sleep. Snooze So You Don't Lose Drink up Don’t wait until you feel thirsty to drink. Diabetes can dry you out. Carbohydrates turn right into glucose after you eat them. So it’s extra important to keep them in check. Choose healthy fats like monounsaturated, omega-3, and polyunsaturated ones. Your body needs fat for energy. Filter Your Fats Mind Your Meds Go Small With Alcohol If you do need insulin or other meds, take them as you should, even when you feel good. If you drink, women should stick to one 12-ounce beer, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of liquor a day at most. Men should have only twice that. And don’t drink on an empty stomach or when your blood sugar is low. Be Carb Smart

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